Roundup: Coventry Cathedral, the falsifiability of Christianity, racism, a child’s letter, liturgy, and a “recycled orchestra”

I apologize for not generating much original content lately. I haven’t anything substantive to present at the moment, but I have been voraciously reading up and taking notes on the history behind the building and art of Coventry Cathedral—one of England’s four twentieth-century cathedrals and my favorite part of my visit to England in April—in preparation for a blog series. In the meantime, I can offer you a few teaser photos and links to some articles of note that I read this week.

Baptistery Window, Coventry Cathedral

Baptistery Window, Coventry Cathedral. Designed by John Piper and made by Patrick Reyntiens. Photo: Victoria Emily Jones

Crucifixion by Graham Sutherland

Detail of the “east” end tapestry designed by Graham Sutherland, Coventry Cathedral. Photo: Victoria Emily Jones

Glass Screen, Coventry Cathedral

“West” Window (detail), Coventry Cathedral. Incised glass by John Hutton. The ruins of the original cathedral are visible through the glass. Photo: Victoria Emily Jones

“Christianity, the World’s Most Falsifiable Religion” by C. Michael Patton: “Christianity is the only viable worldview that is historically defensible. The central claims of the Bible demand historic inquiry, as they are based on public events that can be historically verified. In contrast, the central claims of all other religions cannot be historically tested and, therefore, are beyond falsifiability or inquiry. They just have to be believed with blind faith.”

“Before Leading Your Congregation in a Discussion of ‘Race’ and ‘Racism,’ You May Want to Check a Few Things” by Thabiti Anyabwile: This article is geared toward church leaders, but there are some takeaways for bloggers too who are eager to address the topic of race in light of recent news stories: (1) Check your motive. (2) Check your strategy. (3) Check your goal. (4) Check your timeline. (5) Check your terms. (6) Check your theology. (7) Check your feelings. (8) Check your competence. 

Rowan Williams answers a letter from a six-year-old to God: This happened two years ago, but I just recently read about it. I’ve always admired Williams, and now even more so!

“Is the New Evangelical Liturgy Really an Improvement?” by Kevin DeYoung: “Every church has a liturgy. But not every liturgy is as good, or strong, or deep, or biblical, or gospel-centered as every other.” This article made me grateful for the staff at my church, Citylife Presbyterian, who week after week creates an order of service that includes all the elements of the “old liturgy” of traditional Protestantism: “adoration, confession, assurance, thanksgiving, petition, instruction, charge, and blessing.” My faith has been greatly enriched as a result, as church gatherings have taken on such a vaster meaning to me.

The Landfill Harmonic Orchestra (trailer below): “A film about a garbage picker, a music teacher and a group of children from a Paraguayan slum who play instruments made entirely of garbage.” The documentary is currently in production and is scheduled to release in January 2014. Visit www.landfillharmonicmovie.com to read more about the project and/or to make a donation.

This entry was posted in Film, History, Inspirational, Music, Western Art. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Roundup: Coventry Cathedral, the falsifiability of Christianity, racism, a child’s letter, liturgy, and a “recycled orchestra”

  1. I really like what you guyss are usually up too.
    Such clever work and reporting! Keep up the good works guys I’ve incorporated you guys to blogroll.

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